Mabel Waltz

    1860s, Daniel Godfrey  (1831 – 1903)  [Stratton Military Band Journal, 1866]

        Daniel was the son of the famous English bassoonist and conductor, Charles Godfrey, and studied at the Royal Academy of Music. Later, he became a Fellow and Professor of Military Music at the academy. He served as Band Master of the Grenadier Guards from 1856 – 96, though erroneously listed as the Coldstream Guards on the original sheet music. He first toured the U.S. in 1872.

 

Maggie By My Side:  Grand March

    1852, Stephen C. Foster  (1826 – 1864)   [Brass Band Journal, 1854]

        This is an interesting setting for Foster's “sea - song.” The lyrics tell the tale of a sailor and his faithful dog, Maggie. Foster was not very good at relationships with humans but apparently he always enjoyed the unconditional love of a dog, as he composed several songs about faithful pets.  A 2-page manuscript of “Maggie By My Side” went for $4500 at auction in 1968.

 

Majestic Grand March

    Claudio S. Grafulla  (1810 – 1880) [pub: 1884 by H.G. Frankenfield]

 

Manual of Arms Polka

    1862, Claudio S. Grafulla  (1810 – 1880) / arr: Mark A. Elrod   [piano: Firth, Pond & Co.]

        A handbill for a promenade concert, dated November 14, 1863, lists the “7th Regiment Manual of Arms  (Polka)” as one of the evening's musical selections. Grafulla incorporated many pre-Civil War bugle calls in his polka and also included the tune “Touch the Elbow,” (1862) by Pvt. Barnes, which, along with the “Drum Corps Quickstep,” was considered the official song of the 7th Regt.  Barnes, who later became Major General of the California State Militia, wrote the song while at Fort Federal Hill.

                               

Marching Through Georgia

    1865, Henry Clay Work  (1832 – 1884)    [piano: Root & Cady]

        The event that the song celebrates is of course, Sherman's march “From Atlanta to the Sea.” Like any good propaganda piece, the song takes no notice of the actual realities of the situation it glorifies. The fact that Sherman's devastating month-long march, so filled with senseless destruction, came after the Confederacy was already substantially defeated and that it was motivated more by imperious self-aggrandizement than by military necessity. This song still stirs the flames in the South. Beware!

        “Georgia” was written shortly after General Sherman began his famous march to the sea about the 16th of November 1864. Mr. Work wrote some splendid army songs, but his reputation will rest on “Marching Through Georgia.” So universal in its use was “Georgia” that General Sherman heard it with supreme disgust. It pursued him from city to city, and from state to state, and in all the great cities of Europe in which he was received. When the General attended the national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic in Boston in 1890, he saw from the reviewing stand two hundred and fifty bands, and a hundred fife and drum corps pass in review; and the old warrior stood for seven mortal hours listening to the never ending strains of the music which commemorates the most triumph march of modern times. His patience collapsed, and with a grim gravity, peculiar to him, and in language too emphatic for repetition here, he declared that he would never attend another national encampment until every band in the United States has signed an agreement not to play “Marching Through Georgia” in his presence. This was Sherman's last encampment, and when the tune was next played in his presence, six months after, “there came no response from the echoless shore to which his soul had wafted.”   (Notes from Bill Warren)

 

Marseilles Hymn

    1792, Claude Roget de Lisle (1760 – 1836) [Brass Band Journal, 1854]

        see La Marseillaise

 

Martha Q.S.  

    1847, Friedrich von Flotow  (1812 – 1883)    [26th Regt. North Carolina Troops, C.S.A. Band Books]

        With its delightful dances and lovely arias, Martha took the world by storm; but not until its translation into English and the inclusion of Thomas Moore's  'Twas the Last Rose of Summer. The opera went limp for 6 years until it was revamped for American audiences. The comedy is set in England and deals with the mis-adventures of Lady Harriet and her friend Nancy, who hire themselves out at the fair as servants to two young farmers. Now, as Martha and Julia, they fall in love with the farmers and Martha is proposed to. In the night, tired of the charade, they make their escape. When it is later revealed the proposing farmer is actually the long lost son of the earl of Derby, the two marry—The End.

 

Martha Quadrilles

    186-, Friedrich von Flotow  [Squire’s Cornet Band Olio No.1]

 

Maryland, My Maryland & The Old North State

    trad. German & Mrs. E.E. Randolph   [26th NC, C.S.A. Band Books]

        James Ryder Randall was teaching at Poydras College, near New Orleans, when riots broke out in Baltimore, April 23, 1861. The Maryland native, anxious to see his home state join her sister states and secede from the Union, wrote a poem exulting over the display of solidarity demonstrated by Baltimore's citizens. His students suggested he publish the poem. It appeared in several newspapers and was set to the German “Tannenbaum” by the Cary sisters of Baltimore. Oliver Wendell Holmes praised Randall's poem as the best produced by the war. “The Old North State,” with words by William Gaston, is the official state song of North Carolina.

 

Masonic Dead March

    Claudio S. Grafulla  (1810 – 1880)  [pub: 1890 by Mace Gay]

 

Masonic March

    1854, J. Schatzman    [Peters' Saxhorn Journal, 1859]

 

Massa's In the Cold Ground

    1852, Stephen C. Foster   (1826 – 1864) [Brass Band Journal, 1854]

        Over 45,000 copies of this song were sold within 5 years of publication. Though sung in the refrain, it wasn’t until after the Civil War that a second “Cold” was added to the song’s title. Possibly inspired by Thomas Moore’s ballad When Cold in the Ground, tradition states Foster was troubled by his own father’s failing health. In the song, the slaves mourn the passing of a kindly master.

 

May Flower Waltz

    18--, unknown   [music found in the archives of the U.S. Marine Corps]

        Several piano versions were published. A very early publication is by Bassini (1840), and another by William Cooper Glynn (1846). T.B. Boyer and Louis Meyer also published waltzes under this name. It is difficult to tell whether any of these are the same tune as the presented here, or even compared to themselves, as the variations are quite elaborate.

 

Memories of Home

    18--, M.H. Hogson   [Stratton Military Band Journal]

        Stratton arranged this lovely waltz in the manner of Strauss. Could be H.H. Hogson.

 

Mendelssohn’s Wedding March

    Felix Mendelssohn-Bartoldy (1809 – 1847) [Brass Band Journal, 1854]

        This is the famous wedding march from A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

 

Midnight Hours Medley

    18--, anon   [1st Brigade Band Books]

        Two selections: At Midnight Hour and Tis Midnight Hour (1850) are presented.  One published piano score lists the former as composed by A Gentleman of Virginia, while An Amateur composed the latter. The score for “Tis M H” is dedicated to Miss Elizabeth Lewis of Cincinnati, and is the melody source for this selection. Though this editor has not seen the music, another Tis Midnight Hour was published in 1848 as “A Popular Melody from the Opera “Die Wiener in Berlin.” Arranged as an Easy Waltz for the piano by Charles Grobe.” It is uncertain whether this is the same piece.

 

Midnight Serenade

    18--, ?   [1st Brigade Band Books]

 

The Minstrel Boy

    1813, Sir Thomas Moore  (17791852)  [piano]

        In 1807, Irish poet Thomas Moore was commissioned to pen new lyrics to old Irish melodies, in much the same manner as done with Scottish tunes by Robert Burns. Moore claims the melody was called “The Moreen” though no published account can be found. He penned “The Minstrel Boy” in 1813. It speaks of Ireland's determination to be free, using the minstrel and his harp as metaphors. It quickly became a popular fife tune and was associated with many sets of lyrics. It was even sung by Teddy Roosevelt's “Rough Riders” as a campaign song.

 

Mockingbird & Irishman's Shanty
    Septimus Winner (1827 – 1902) & Irish trad. /arr: W.E. Gilmore   [25th Mass. Band Books]   

        Winner was from a musical family in that his father was a violinmaker and his brother, Joseph, was also a composer (The Little Brown Jug). Septimus was a storekeeper and music teacher in Philadelphia where he would hear “Whistlin' Dick” Milburn, a Negro boy, serenading people in the street with his guitar and bird-like warbling. Some sources also say Winner was a barber. Winner used one of Dick's melodies for Mockingbird and gave him prominent credit on the published music. He published it under his mother's name, Alice Hawthorne. He also gave Dick a job in the store. Lacking foresight, Winner sold the rights to the song for $5.00 after slow initial sales. The song sold millions of copies over the next 50 years. Later editions removed the credit to Milburn.

     The inclusion of the shanty, with its minor mode, results in a very effective medley.

 

Mockingbird Q.S.   

    1854, Septimus Winner (1827 – 1902) and Richard Milburn     [3rd NH “Port Royal” Band Books]

        Winner was from a musical family in that his father was a violinmaker and his brother, Joseph, was also a composer (The Little Brown Jug). Septimus was a storekeeper and music teacher in Philadelphia where he would hear “Whistlin' Dick” Milburn, a Negro boy, serenading people in the street with his guitar and bird-like warbling. Some sources also say Winner was a barber. Winner used one of Dick's melodies for Mockingbird and gave him prominent credit on the published music. He published it under his mother's name, Alice Hawthorne. He also gave Dick a job in the store. Lacking foresight, Winner sold the rights to the song for $5.00 after slow initial sales. The song sold millions of copies over the next 50 years. Later editions removed the credit to Milburn.

 

Mockingbird & Twinkling Stars Q.S.  

    Septimus Winner (1827 – 1902) & John P. Ordway   [26th NC, C.S.A. Band Books]

        An almost identical version of this medley can be found in the Hosea Ripley Collection at the New York Public Library. The Ripley version has much more embellishment than the 26th NC, so it's difficult to ascertain who copied who. The complete titles are “Listen To the Mocking Bird” and “Twinkling Stars Are Laughing, Love.” See Listen to the Mockingbird

 

Mockingbird & Twinkling Stars Q.S.  

    Septimus Winner (1827 – 1902) & John P. Ordway   [Hosea Ripley Collection]

 

The Moon is Above Us

    18--, Fabio Campana (1819 – 1882) [Stratton Military Band Journal ]

 

Monitor Grand March

    1862, E. Mack    [piano/ Perry Roland]

        March 9, 1862 was the fateful date of the clash between the ironclad CSS Virginia (formerly US Merrimack) and the US ironclad Monitor (the “cheesebox on a raft.”) The ships pummeled one another for four and a half-hours before the Virginia withdrew. Though the Monitor held Hampton Roads it was not victorious. Successful? Yes. Neither vessel survived the war.

 

Monte Sano Two-Step

    1897, Hough Guest      [piano]

        Monte Sano is the small mountain that defines the eastern boundary of the city of Huntsville, Alabama, the home of the Olde Towne Brass. For many years, a sanatorium (health resort) operated there, as rumors go, because there were no or at least few mosquitoes. Trees of rare Shittam wood grow in the Bankhead Forest, named for the enterprising Bankhead family, of which, daughter Tallulah is most remembered. The tune is dedicated to the proprietors of the Monte Sano Hotel.

 

Moonbeam Waltzes

    1859, Henry Farmer  (1819 – 1891)  [4th NH, Manchester Cornet Band Books]

        Henry Farmer was a British violinist and composer. The arrangement is by David L. Downing who was a prominent bandmaster and composer in New York. The beautiful chorale-promenade gives way to a “call and response” introduction and finally the dance, itself. The piece is fully functional as a dance vehicle, but is equally suited for the concert stage.

 

Mountain Echo Polka

    pre 1860, anon   [1st Brigade Band Books]

        This delightful polka can also be found in the 26th North Carolina band books indicating it’s universal appeal.

 

Mother Dear (Fairy Belle)

    Stephen Collins Foster (1826 – 1864) [19th Bat. Virginia Heavy Artillery Band]

        From the Smithfield collection.

 

Motor Q.S.

    Claudio S. Grafulla (1810 – 1880)  [3rd NH  “Port Royal” Band Books] (#12)

 

 Mount Vernon Polka

    1855, by Charles W. Reinhart [Squire's Cornet Band Olio No.2, 1872]

        The sheet music states that Philadelphia Band, No. 1, performed it at Cape May. The namesake of this polka does not refer to George Washington's home, but to the Mount Vernon Hotel in Cape May, New Jersey. In the 1850's this hotel was one of the largest and most popular resort hotels in America and was the largest wooden structure of its kind in the world. The hotel burned in 1871, lighting up the sky as far away as Philadelphia.

 

My Lodging Is On the Cold Ground

    1775, Matthew Locke (1632 – 1677) [Eaton’s National and Popular Songs]

        The famous melody was first published around 1737, with words by Sir William Davenport, and was used in a London ballad opera. The country of origin has been disputed by Ireland and Great Britain. With new words, “My Lodging” was sung in Richard Brinsly Sheridan’s The Rivals in 1775. In 1808, poet Thomas Moore published his own lyric, “Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms,” in “Moore’s Selection of Irish Melodies.” In celebration of the 200th Anniversary of Harvard University in 1836, new lyrics were added. Fair Harvard became the new alma mater.

 

My Old Kentucky Home, Good Night

    1852, Stephen Collins Foster  (1826 – 1864)   [piano] 

        With an original title of “Poor Uncle Tom, Good Night” and a text that mirrored Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, it is doubtful Foster had Federal Hill, the home of Judge John Rowan in Bardstown, Kentucky, in mind. Nevertheless, the legend of one of Foster's sisters turning down the marriage proposal of John Rowan Jr. at Federal Hill lives on. The senior Rowan was a cousin of Foster's father. The song became Kentucky's State Song in 1928.

 

My Wife Is A Most Knowing Woman

    1863, Stephen Collins Foster  (1826 – 1864)     [piano]

        Foster collaborated with lyricist George Cooper on 23 songs that were intended for quick sale to publishers and minstrel performers with no royalty arrangements. Though these songs do not approach the quality of his earlier works, they do demonstrate that Foster retained his facility at setting verses to appropriate and graceful tunes. Some assume the angry sentiment of the narrator to reflect Foster's troubled married life; but the words are Cooper's. Foster may have inspired the lyric.